The Origins of Tai-Chi

Photography : Eléonore HENRY DE FRAHAN    

Emblême du Tai-chi au pied des monts Wudang.
For the preservation of the Wudang Mountains, classed as world heritage sites by UNESCO. A bus tour has been set up by the local tourist office, to visit the different temples.
For the preservation of the Wudang Mountains, classed as world heritage sites by UNESCO. A bus tour has been set up by the local tourist office, to visit the different temples.
A gondola provides access to the Temple of Gold.
Thousands of sometimes dangerous steps link the temples of Wudangshan together.
The mural tells the story of the fight between eagle and serpent, relating to the origins of Tai Chi'.
The Temple of Gold. Chinese people come to pray in the Taoist temples of the site.
Chinese people come to pray in the Taoist temples of the site.
Chinese people come to pray in the Taoist temples of the site.
Lovers hang padlocks across the terraces, on which they engrave their names. These are padlocks without keys, to prove that their love is steadfast.
Aux sources du tai-chi dans les montagnes sacrées. Wudangshan, province du Hubei, Chine.
Partly out of superstition, partly out of sheer playfulness, visitors throw up a roll of red ribbon which, if it gets caught in the tree's branches, will bring them good luck.
Cérémonie du thé.
Palais Zixiao
Un des jeunes élèves du maître Yuan Li Ming s'exerce sur la terrasse de son école
Un des élèves du maître Yuan Li Ming s'exerce sur la terrasse de son école.
Yuan Li ming, jeune maître de Tai-chi, enseigne aux Occidentaux désireux de s'initier à cet art martial.
Yuan Li Ming, Tai Chi' master. Wudangshan.
Aux sources du tai-chi dans les montagnes sacrées. Wudangshan, province du Hubei, Chine.
Yuan Li Ming, Tai Chi' master.
Inside the Zixiao palace. Wudangshan.
Yuan Li Ming, Tai Chi' master.